What is blooming now. . . portraits of reliable fall blooming plants.

Golden Raintree, Koelreuteria bipinnata, has seed pods that are as pretty as flowers.

Obedient plant blooms bountifully.
Ivy-leaved cyclamen, C. hederifolium, is only 4 inches tall but its bright color makes it a stand-out.
Japanese anemone ‘Andrea Atkinson’ forms a large colony about 5 feet wide.
Very reliable sedum flowers change from pink to deep russet.
Narrow-leaf Sunflower is a bright exclamation point in the fall garden.
This aster is very fragrant and climbs up to 8 feet.

‘October Skies’ native aster

This toad lily, Miyazaki, shows some atypical coloration

Cooler weather helps plants and gardeners.

With temps in the 90s and a little rain, my garden seems to be breathing a sigh of relief. Many plants are blooming again. Most of my roses are in full bloom which I didn’t expect until fall. My brown turkey fig, on the patio, is bearing fruit too. They have an opening on the end which ants love to take advantage of, so I put a little plug of vaseline there and problem solved.

Brown turkey figs are my favorite because they remind of the bush that grew in my Grandmother Brockett’s yard.
Outhouse Hibiscus
Grown for its fragrance and soft velvety leaves.
Also in the patio area is a bodacious Hibiscus grandiflora or Swamp Hibiscus. It has huge velvety green leaves and pink fragrant flowers. It was often grown beside the outhouse, for obvious reasons. It was also called The Outhouse Rose.
A beautiful hibiscus from my friend, Russell Studebaker. It is very tall with 5-6″ blooms. The dark pink hibsicus is H. mutabilis ‘Rubrum’.
A favorite hibiscus for hummingbirds, Turk’s Cap Mallow, a native wildflower,  Malvaviscus arboreus var. drummondii

What an honor. . .!

The coral orienpet (oriental x trumpet) is 4 feet tall, with flowers 10 inches across.

Thanks. I was so surprised to hear from Brenda of http://theblondegardener.wordpress.com, who nominated me for the One Lovely Blog Award. The award increases readership of garden blogs and awareness.

I’m always thrilled to hear from readers who have been following my blog. I’ve heard from people in Malaysia, India, Japan and all over the US and Canada.

The requirements for accepting the nomination are to nominate 10 of my favorite blogs and notify the owners and to list 7 random facts about myself.

I like snakes and other creepy crawlies. I’ve sung in choirs since I was six years old. I speak fluent Spanish and understand Italian and French pretty well in context.  Photography has been a hobby of mine since the 70s.  I used to have my own darkroom. I am a plantaholic (is there a 12-step group for that?) Thanks to my husband, Jerry, for making this nomination possible because he is my best help in the garden.

I nominate the following garden blogs:

My Return to the Garden

Nigella has rather alien-looking flowers.

Foxglove flowers circle the stem facing outward.

After my fall when planting a ‘Little Gem’ magnolia, I had another more worrisome result: a fibro flare. I have fibromyalgia, a muscle-pain syndrome. The fall pushed it into overdrive, so I’ve been at home and in bed a lot since February. I’m making my post-fall debut with a study of nature’s intricacy in flower and leaf shape and arrangement.

Leaves of Penstemon murrayanus are perfoliate, meaning the stem comes up through the leaves.

Phlomis flowers are arranged around the stem.

My Latest Garden Escapade

Hello to everyone. I’ve been away from my blog since the last of February. After my husband, Jerry, and I planted a ‘Little Gem’ Magnolia on our new berm (140′ x 12′ x 4′ to buffer wider Crossover Road), I slipped in the mud and fell forward on my hands, HARD! My right radius is broken and my left arm is severely sprained, so my typing skills are limited. But,  so much is blooming this month, I just had to share with you.

Empress Daffodil from Old House Gardens.

Snowflakes are a minor bulb with dainty green-tipped blooms.

The Geranium Narcissus is an old-timey favorite because of its color and fragrance.

'Cameo' is a beautiful cultivar of the red flowering quince.

Flowering Cherry blossoms opened very early.

This Georgia Speedwell, Veronica, makes an excellent ground cover.

2011 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2011 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 5,400 times in 2011. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 5 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

Arkansas Autumn Walk

multicolored leaves of Sassafras

Here are some of the views of autumn from a walk around our yard. Japanese Anemone ‘Andrea Atkinson’ is in full bloom, too. Savor the fragrance of fall and the colors. Enjoy!

'Andrea Atkinson' Japanese Anemone

'Empress' toadlily, a jewel of a fall flower

  • October Glory maple
  • horse chestnut and Southern red oak

Plants that can stand the heat.

Here are some photos of plants that were blooming this morning. Today is 110° in the shade, so in the sun, it is probably 115°.  We water every morning, but by noon, some of the plants

are already wilted again. Remember to water your trees! (The variegated shrub in front of the hibiscus is ‘Fairy’ a Caryopteris.)

Castor Bean plant with Mr. Lincoln rose.

Hibiscus mutabilis 'Rubrum'

These Gerber daisies look cool even in 110° temperatures.