Plants for Winter Blooms

The evergreen shrub above  should be a must-have for gardeners suffering from winter blues. Daphne (D. odora aureomarginata) is full of buds right now. It will start blooming the last of January and continue right through February. The best thing about the flowers, since they are small, is that they smell wonderful, a lemony sweet fragrance. Float a few of the flower clusters in a small bowl to bring the rich scent into the home.

The flowers below belong to my Japanese Flowering Apricot tree, Prunus mume. It is a lovely small tree, not grown for its fruit, but for the early flowers. It is completely budded now. The buds are still tight, but they will open around the first part of February. Branches may forced in the house for even earlier blooms.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hellebores, in the third photo, are sometimes called Lenten Roses. They begin to bloom in February also, and come in several colors:  white, white with speckles, pink, dark rose and a deep maroon that is almost black. Their evergreen leaves are palmate and the nodding flowers show up well in the foliage.

These plants keep winter from being too dreary. Include some in your garden for year-round flowers.


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Garden Programs for 2011—Open to all (via From Lynn's Garden)

Garden Programs for 2011---Open to all 2011 Laurin Wheeler Program Series Flower, Garden and Nature Society of NWAR   January  15     Round-table discussion. Bring favorite garden tool for show and tell and be prepared to share what works for you in your garden. February 19    Karyn Zaremba-Culver, owner of Bean Mountain Farms and Herbal Simplicity, will present a hands-on program, “I’ve Grown These Beautiful Herbs, Now What Do I Do With Them?”, featuring how to make herbal sugar … Read More

via From Lynn's Garden

Posted in Uncategorized.

Garden Programs for 2011—Open to all

2011 Laurin Wheeler Program Series

Flower, Garden and Nature Society of NWAR

 

January  15     Round-table discussion. Bring favorite garden tool for show

and tell and be prepared to share what works for you in your

garden.

February 19    Karyn Zaremba-Culver, owner of Bean Mountain Farms and Herbal

Simplicity, will present a hands-on program, “I’ve Grown These

Beautiful Herbs, Now What Do I Do With Them?”, featuring how to

make herbal sugars, vinegars and oils.

March 19        C. Colston Burrell, international lecturer, garden designer, award winning

author, naturalist and photographer. Books include: Hellebores: A

Comprehensive Guide, Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants, Rodale’s

Illustrated Encyclopedia of Perennials, Perennial Combinations,

Perennials for Today’s Gardens and A Gardener’s Encyclopedia of

Wildflowers. His garden, Bird Hill, near Charlottesville, Virginia was featured

in the New York Times and other publications.  “Native

Alternatives to Invasive Plants”

April 16        Dr. Gerald Klingaman, Director of Operations, Botanical Garden of the

Ozarks,  “Hardy Ferns for Northwest Arkansas.”

May 21         Gail Pianalto, Washington County Master Gardener and co-founder of

Wa. Co. Junior Master Gardeners, has given talks at 4 national meetings

of  the American Horticulture Society’s Children and Youth Gardening

Symposium. She will present as “Luna Lovegood on Moon Gardening,”

about how the garden doesn’t go to sleep at night.

As the day shift leaves, the night shift comes to work.

June 11         Through the Garden Gate tour at selected Northwest Arkansas  gardens

July 16          Leigh Wilkerson, organic gardener and garden writer,

“Edible Landscaping”

August 20       Tom Dillard, Director of Special Collections, UA Library,

“More than Hostas: Gardening in the Shade.”

September 17   Dr. Ashley Dowling, UA Entomology Department, “Ant lions, Tiger

Beetles and Lace Wings, Oh My!” The story on the “other” benefi-

cial insects that help us control garden pests.

October 15       Larry Lowman, former owner of very successful Ridgecrest Nursery

in Wynne, AR. “Native Success Stories by a Southern Nurseryman.”

November 19   Steve Sampers, president of NWA Master Naturalists, will give a

presentation on the  “Master Naturalist Program and Training.”

Social time begins at 9:30 with the programs starting around 10:00 a.m. Contact: Lynn Rogers, 479-521-9090. Meet in

Student Center of NWAR Technical Institute, 709 S. Old Missouri Rd.,

(red light at Ford and Hwy 265) Springdale, AR. Meetings are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.

Japanese Iris (I. ensata) 'Strut and Flourish'

2010 in review—my first year as a blogger.

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

A Boeing 747-400 passenger jet can hold 416 passengers. This blog was viewed about 2,100 times in 2010. That’s about 5 full 747s.

 

In 2010, there were 27 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 33 posts. There were 57 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 53mb. That’s about 1 pictures per week.

The busiest day of the year was January 31st with 30 views. The most popular post that day was late January 2010 snow.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were ozarksalive.org, fairegarden.wordpress.com, nadiaknows.com, mail.yahoo.com, and mail.live.com.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for evergreen ferns, from lynn’s garden, lynn’s garden, ice storm 2010, and daylilies.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

late January 2010 snow January 2010
2 comments

2

Evergreen Ferns and relatives brighten the Winter landscape. January 2010
2 comments

3

Happy New Year 2010 January 2010
4 comments

4

FGNS Through the Garden Gate Tour May 2010
7 comments

5

Great Garden Programs for 2010 February 2010
1 comment

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